Posted in 1.2 Message Design, 501 Introduction to Educational Technology

Elements of Educational Technology

Originally Published October, 2011

In my discussions about educational technologies I’ve found people often use the same term to talk about very different practices. Robert Reiser talks about some of the difficulties linguistics play in defining a field in his article History of Instructional
 Design and Technology:
Part I: A History of Instructional Media. He points out that, for many people, the term instructional technologies conjured up ideas limited to instructional technologies such as CD-ROMS, computers, and projectors. (Reiser & Ely, 1997). Herein he points out that how we define a subject frames future conversations.

According to The Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) the current definition of educational technologies is, “The study and ethical practice of facilitating learning and improving performance by creating, using, and managing appropriate technological processes and resources.” (Januszewski & Molenda, 2008, p. 1). This definition encompasses management systems, design, learning tools, and instructional media. Yet, to establish a common starting point for discussion we should look at the role of each element individually.

For me, the components of this definition have a hierarchy. Improving performance is the goal. Managing the process outlines the path; the study, creation, facilitation, and usage all provide a means to the end. Prioritizing element helps drill through a complex term with a broad meaning. As the former employee of a corporate e-learning company, our conversations with new clients followed this same sequence. What is your company’s mission? How does management support that? What gaps need to be filled? What content do you need delivered? What is the best delivery method for your employees? We had to ask questions in this manner to evaluate how well our product could meet their needs. When it comes to educational technology not enough conversation happens around how it can be used to better manage the education process.

As I reflect on life as an educator, I’m amazed at how the road map to success twists–and then twists again. Objectives shift from preparing student for a 21st century work force to raising test scores. In my observations, a clear vision and well thought-out implementation plan for adoption of educational technologies leads to authentic integration.

The US Department of Education states their mission is to:

  • Strengthen the Federal commitment to assure access to equal educational opportunity for every individual;
  • Increased involvement in public education of the public, parents, and students in Federal education programs;
  • Promote improvements in the quality and usefulness of education
  • Improve the coordination of Federal education programs;
  • Improve the management of Federal education activities; and
  • Increase the accountability of Federal education programs

Based on this vision, the discussion should be how are we managing the implementation of educational technologies to meet these goals.

If we look to other large US agencies we can see how common vision and management implementation are critical for the organizations ability to function properly. In the 911 Commission Report published August 2004, the Commission revealed a systemic problem within the intelligence community.

The U.S. government did not find a way of sharing intelligence and using it to guide the planning and assignment of responsibilities for joint operations involving entities as disparate as the CIA, the FBI, the State Department, the military, and the agencies involved in homeland security.

Similar to the problem highlighted by 911 Commission, our education system needs to reassess how we pool information and resources to ensure equal access to quality education.

The landscape of the 21st century is entirely different from it was at the birth of American education system. One teacher delivering content to classroom 25-30 students is a model developed at time when information could only be delivered to the masses through people and print. Through years of research, we now know that learners have different learning styles, intelligences, skills, disabilities, points of motivation, and interests. To apply this knowledge in a meaningful ways we need to analyze how technology can help us improve how we manage the education process.

To summarize, improved management through technology has the ability to advance processes. Educators face the daily challenge of meeting each individual’s needs with “just-in-time” tools and resources. Technologies like learning/content management systems and data collection have already transformed the way corporations train employees and market to consumers. These same applications applied to education will leverage resources and increase student success.

References

Reiser, R.A., & Ely, D.P. (1997). The field of educational technology as reflected through its definitions. Edu- cational Technology Research and Development, 45(3), 63-72.

Januszewski, A., & Molenda, M. (2008). Chapter 1: Definition. In Educational technology: A definition with commentary (pp. 1 – 14). NY: Lawrence Erlbaum, Inc.

US Department of Education. (2011), Overview, Mission http://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/mission/mission.html

The 911 Commission. (2004), The 911 Commission Report, Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States–EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. http://www.9-11commission.gov/report/911Report_Exec.htm

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Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.2 Message Design, 512 Online Course Design, DESIGN

Pre-Planning Activities

Gantt Project Time Line (p.181)


Screen Shot 2013-03-09 at 11.33.33 AM

 

 

Completed Task Objective Analysis (p.188-196)

Clustered Objectives (p.198)

1.0 Using Forms to Gather Data

  • A. Prerequisites (objective 1.1)
  • B. Application (objectives 1.2, 1.5)
  • C. Analysis (objective 1.3-1.4)

2.0 Google Drive to Save You Time

  • A. Prerequisites (objectives 2.1-2.3)
  • B. Application (objectives 2.4-2.5)
  • C. Analysis (objective 2.6)

3.0 Blog Planning for Better Preparation

  • A. Prerequisites (objective 3.1)
  • B. Application (objectives 3.2-3.4)
  • C. Analysis (objectives 3.5-3.6)

4.0 Authentic Student Engagement with Digital Learning Logs

  • A. Prerequisites (objective 4.1)
  • B. Application (objective 4.2)
  • C. Analysis (objective 4.3)
Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 512 Online Course Design, DESIGN

Summative & Formative Evaluation Planning

Assignment 1: General Overview of Evaluation Criteria (p. 132)

Evaluation Criteria Explanation Data Source
Appeal: create a connection for user between the formula (daily activities + time management tools = more efficiency.) Review ability to hook the audience by pin pointing real life challenges
  • Teacher KLW survey
  • Application of technologies in the classroom
  • Time on task survey
Usability: ease of user access and use Determine if users are able to navigate the course without any tech support
  • Ability to turn assignments in
  • User interest in taking another similar course
 Effectiveness: ability to utilize the tools as they were taught in the WBI course Determine if participants are able to apply new skills
  • Frequency with which the technologies are applied the classroom

General Evaluation Orientation (p.132)

This course model is oriented toward the participant.  The both formative and summative assessments will be designed to evaluate how well the course has served the participants needs.

Evaluation Matrix: Formative Evaluation Questions. (p140)

Evaluation Criteria & Categories Questions
Appeal
Goals
  • Are the goals relevant to the learner?
  • Is there a clear connection between technology use and time management?
  • Are the goals manageable for learners at varying levels technology proficiencies?
Content
  • Does the information directly address teachers’ daily duties?
  • Is the information applicable immediately?
  • How many people will application of the content impact?
Technology
  • Is the navigation intuitive?
  • Are the materials easy to access?
  • Is the course free of typos?
Message Design
  • Is the course organization easy to understand?
  • Do the videos, graphics, fonts, and colors have universal appeal?
  • Is the course pitched at adult learners of varying age and skill level?
Efficiency
Goals
  • Are the goals stated clearly and concisely?
Content
  • Is the content appropriate for all teaching disciplines?
Technology
  • Is the LMS/web structured properly?
  • Is access to other learners or an instructor an option?
  • Do technology applications outside the course design function easily and efficiently (Google & Weebly)?
Message Design
  • Does the information scaffold on prior skills?
  • Is there a clear organizational pattern?
Effectiveness
Goals
  • How do the goals support best practice instructional strategies?
  • How to the goals reprioritize teachers time?
Content
  • Will the information enable teachers to apply skills immediately or will additional practice be needed?
  • Does the information reflect current instructional practices?
Technology
  • Will the required WBI platform (Edmodo) support learners?
  • Will there be access to an instructor or other learners?
Message Design
  • Is the message design consistent with district instructional practices?
  • Are the directions short and concise?
  • Have screen shots been used according to district standards?

Stakeholders (p.143)

Primary Stakeholders

  • Designer: Responsible for course quality and revisions
  • Instructor: Responsible for informing the designer of snags or challenges in the course
  • Learners: will spend time trying to expunge information from the course
  • Learner’s students: successfully application will directly impact how the students are trained to use these tools.

Secondary Stakeholders

  • ITC department: The course reflects the department’s productivity level
  • School Administration: teachers working smarter reallocates time teachers’ time
  • Parents: Transparency and efficiency = more effective instructional time

What is Being Evaluated? (p.145)

   
  • Motivation strategies
  • Objectives
Design Plans
  • Grouping of objectives
  • Instructions
  • Activities
  • Example Items
Prototype & Website
  • Assessment items
  • Navigation
  • Interface
  • Collaborative Modeling

Who Are The Evaluators and Reviewers (p. 147)

Evaluator/EDTECH 512 Online Course Design Professor:

Youngkyn Baek has his Ph.D., Educational Foundations and Computer Based Instruction. He is a professor at Boise State University and teaches Online Course Design among other online classes.  Areas of Interest and Expertise: Game-based Learning, Instructional Mobile Game Design, Teaching and Learning in Virtual Worlds.

Evaluator/Designer/Instructor: Gillian Riley is an Instructional Technology Coach for SCCPSS. She holds an Education degree and has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She is also a former Instructional Designer and is ¾ through the M.E.T program at Boise State University.

Expert Reviewer (instructional design, subject matter expert): Wendy Marshall is the Program Manager of the Instructional Technology Department of SCCPSS. She is the former director of the Educational Technology Training Center at Armstrong Atlantic State University.

Expert Reviewer (instructional design): Cris Higginbotham has her Ed.S. in Education and is an Instructional Technology Coach SCCPSS high school teachers.  She headed the adoption of Edmodo as a LMS for professional development and has developed the districts first online courses for teachers.

Expert Reviewer (subject matter): Stephen Routh is Science teacher in SCCPSS. He is partnering with the designer to test implementation logistics. Stephen is an avid user of Google Apps for Educators and is a leader of technology integration at his school and throughout the district.

Expert Reviewer (instructional design): Melissa Milligan is and Instructional Technology Coach at the middle and elementary level for SCCPSS. She has her Ed.S. in Education and is an online instructor.

Expert Reviewer (instructor): Caronia Shafer has 12 years teaching experience and is a professional development coach for SCCPSS. She has her Ed.S. in education and works with the designer as an instructional partner.

End-User Reviewer: Teachers who participate in both the face-2-face course and online version will be asked to give feedback on the course after each module. Learners from of the face-2-face version will have required attendance. Those accessing the content online will have chose to take the course. This should be noted as the responses from participants will be impacted based on how they came to take the course.

Evaluation Matrix Revisions (p.152)

Evaluation Criteria & Categories Questions Methods & Tools

 

Appeal

Goals
  • Are the goals relevant to the learner?
  • Is there a clear connection between technology use and time management?
  • Are the goals manageable for learners at varying levels technology proficiencies?
  • Observation
  • Pre-assessment
  • Pre-requisite survey
Content
  • Does the information directly address teachers’ daily duties?
  • Is the information applicable immediately?
  • How many people will application of the content impact?
  • End-user and expert reviews (SME)
  • Observation
  • Survey
Technology
  • Is the navigation intuitive?
  • Are the materials easy to access?
  • Is the course free of typos?
  • End-user and expert reviews (ID)
  • Survey
Message Design
  • Is the course organization easy to understand?
  • Do the videos, graphics, fonts, and colors have universal appeal?
  • Is the course pitched at adult learners of varying age and skill level?
  • End-user and expert reviews (SME, ID)
  • Survey

 

Efficiency

Goals
  • Are the goals stated clearly and concisely?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)
Content
  • Is the content appropriate for all teaching disciplines?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)
  • End-user review
  • Observation
Technology
  • Is the LMS/web structured properly?
  • Is access to other learners or an instructor an option?
  • Do technology applications outside the course design function easily and efficiently (Google & Weebly)?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)
  • End-user review
Message Design
  • Does the information scaffold on prior skills?
  • Is there a clear organizational pattern?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)

Effectiveness

Goals
  • How do the goals support best practice instructional strategies?
  • How to the goals reprioritize teachers time?
Expert review (SME, ID)
Content
  • Will the information enable teachers to apply skills immediately or will additional practice be needed?
  • Does the information reflect current instructional practices?
End-User and expert (SME, ID) review
Technology
  • Will the required WBI platform (Edmodo) support learners?
  • Will there be access to an instructor or other learners?
Expert review (ID, instructor)
Message Design
  • Is the message design consistent with district instructional practices?
  • Are the directions short and concise?
  • Have screen shots been used according to district standards?
  • Expert review  (ID)
  • Instructor review

Assignment 2:  Summative Assessment (p.163)

 Guiding Questions—Evaluating Appeal

  • Is there a change in appeal of face-2-face professional development vs. WBI?
  • What benefits do participants sight as preference for WBI over face-2-face instruction?
  • What challenges do participants sight a detractor for WBI vs. face-2-face instruction?
Data Source  Rationale & communication method Time-frame
Survey participant perceptions Evaluate the appeal of online professional development to present report to department head and board of education. Face-2-face data collected Spring 2013. Online data collected Summer and Winter 2013.
 Guiding Questions—Evaluating Efficiency

  • Do learners find WBI more efficient than face-2-face instruction?
  • Did learners feel their time was spent more efficiently in WBI or face-2-face course?
Data Source Rationale & communication method Time-frame
Survey participant perceptions Evaluate the efficiency of online professional development to present report to department head and board of education. After a face-2-face and online version have been offered (Winter 2013)
 Guiding Questions—Evaluating Effectiveness

  • Was there a difference in implementation rates between face-2-face participants vs. WBI participants?
Data Source Rationale & communication method Time-frame
ObservationInterview participants Evaluate the efficiency of online professional development to present report to department head and board of education. Conducted Spring 2014
Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 512 Online Course Design, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT

EDTECH 512: Online Course Design

Time Management Tools for Teachers Designed by Gillian Riley

timemanagement

Web Based Instructional Design 

 


Final Products

Posted in 1.2 Message Design, 3.4 Policies and Regulations, 5.4 Long-Range Planning, DESIGN, EVALUATION, UTILIZATION

Internet Saftey

Acceptable Use Policies

Acceptable Use Policies, or AUP, can be likened to the “Terms of Service” agreements people sign off on when they access online software. The intention of the AUP is provide a framework for specific information security standards. AUP’s should be succinct, yet also cover how users are and aren’t able to use the IT system. With the rapid pace of technological advancements, the trick for many organizations is to find the balance between excessively restrictive policies and those that fall short of their legal obligations.

The purpose of AUPs is two fold. The first is to protect people in a learning environment from malicious material. The second purpose is to open doors for students to learn and teachers to teach. Keeping AUPs aligned with web 2.0 tools requires constant attention. Some districts update AUPs when the Technology Plan is drafted. Others update yearly, and still others update multiple times in a single year. Some districts use generic language to allow their policies encompass new products.

Tips for Covering the bases with AUPs

  • Consistent enforcement among all staff and faculty
  • Clearly define if tools will be used as learning tools or personal tools
  • Specifically define how certain tools should be used such as a common class Google accounts or material recorded on cameras.
  • Compel all parents and teachers to know, teach, and enforce the districts AUPs.
  • Compose a copy of computer use rules at age appropriate levels in all computer labs.
  • Use computer lab rules that answer “how,” “who” and “when” to adapt to the changing technological landscape.

Here are some examples of AUPs that tackle mobile learning in different ways:

Speers Point Public School Mobile Phone Policy

Mercer County Mobile Device Acceptable Use Policy

Broward County School and District Technology Use

Chatham County Acceptable Policy Use

Resources

Consortium for School Networking. (Sept. 2011). Acceptable use policies in the web 2.0 and mobile era. Learning, Leadership & Policy A CoSn Leadership Initiative. Retrieved from http://www.cosn.org/Default.aspx?tabid=8139

Scrogan, L. (Jul. 2007) AUPs in a web 2.0 world. EDTECH Focus on K12. Retrieved from http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2007/07/aups-in-a-web-20-world

Nagel, D. (Jan. 2011). A better approach to AUP’s for mobile devices: 5 questions with Anthony luscre. The Journal. Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/articles/2011/01/06/a-better-approach-to-aups-for-mobile-devices-5-questions-with-anthony-luscre.aspx

Posted in 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, 3.4 Policies and Regulations, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, UTILIZATION

Educators in the New Digital Age–Getting Started

I’m looking forward to my new job as an instructional technology coach for my school district.  My classroom experience has me thinking about how we, as coaches, will measure our progress and how we will set benchmarks.  I’m working on creating a survey for teachers based on the ISTE National Education Technology Standards for Teachers.  These standards cover how technology is used to enhance collaboration, digital-age learning experiences, digital citizenship, and digital work/learning environments.  While I work on the survey, below is a list of some resources that are helping me synthesize how great tools can translate to great teaching.

Resources

Posted in 1.2 Message Design, 4.2 Resource Management, DESIGN, MANAGEMENT

Content Curation

I used to think that teachers needed an LMS, but after scrolling through some 20 LMS/CM providers today, I’m realizing that collaboration not organization is what teachers miss out on most.  We need to spend less time creating content and more time sharing best practices and content.

Here is my content classification system I designed Dec 2011.  Already, just 6 months later, it feels outdated, but I’m going to hit the drawing board again and see what I can come up with.

Posted in 1.2 Message Design, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.1 Media Utilization, 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, UTILIZATION

Creating Video Blogs-Multimedia In the Classroom

This was an exercise in creating a video blog entry.  I decided rather than use my computer’s camera or my cell phone, that I would create a presentation and use screen capture software to record it.  This decision was made primarily because I wanted an opportunity to try using the free screen capture software Jing.  While Jing is pretty easy to use, I found that the screen capture slowed the pace of the presentation when playing back, especially for the movies I embeded in the power point.  I curious to know how this issue can be addressed.  I also found that in order to share I needed to sign up for a trial version of Screencast.  If this is in fact the only way to share, then it’s not likely Jing, which allows you to shoot videos under 5 minutes will be my go to software.  Other M.E.T. candidates used iMovie (Mac) , Voicethread (designed for collaborative presentations), webcams, and Camtasia for this assignment.

I’m still working on how to embed the video from Screencast. In the meantime here’s a link.

Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.1 Media Utilization, 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, 4.3 Delivery System Management, 4.4 Information Management, 5.4 Long-Range Planning, All, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, EVALUATION, MANAGEMENT, UTILIZATION

Multimedia Integration In the Classroom

The following are a collection of videos to help teachers see what technology integration looks like in the classroom and how it is transforming the learning process. Please be aware the Ted Talk videos do not have a stop play button so you will need to exit out of the site when they finished.

What Technology Integration Looks Like In Elementary School

Meet the faculty at Forest Lake Elementary in Columbia, SC. Starting as techno- novices, they now use customizable software, interactive whiteboards, digital cameras, and more to tailor lessons to the individual needs of diverse students. To see more exciting reports from our Schools that Work series, please visit our website: http://www.edutopia.org/stw-differentiated-instruction-south-carolina

What Technology Integration Looks Like in High School

The DNA of Learning: Teens Tackle Animal Poaching Through Genetics

Eleventh-grade biotechnology students use DNA barcoding to help save endangered African wildlife.

 

Twelfth grade students use Google docs to collaborate on a group science paper. They use scholarly research searches, power point, video and sound clips, blogs, and ScyncronEyes to broadcast to other students computer screens.

Technology Integration with Google Drive

Team Teaching: Two Teachers, Three Subjects, One Project

A pair of educators are sanguine about their art, biology, and multimedia program.

Teaching Kids Real Math With Computers

Conrad Wolfram who runs the mathematical lab and research division behind cutting-edge knowledge engine Wolfram Alpha make an argument teaching real world math in school and leaving computation to computers.

What Technology Integration Looks Like In the Abroad

The Child-Driven Education

Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education — the best teachers and schools don’t exist where they’re needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

Technology Innovation in Slums

Charles Leadbeater, a researcher with the think tank Demos in London, looks at effective education innovation in slums around the world.

What Could A One-to-One Education Look Like?

Electronic TextBooks
Envision electronic textbooks the way Apple sees them.

Technology Integration from CaseNEX on Vimeo.

The 100-Student Classroom

In the fall of 2011 Peter Norvig taught a class with Sebastian Thrun on artificial intelligence at Stanford attended by 175 students in situ — and over 100,000 via an interactive webcast. He shares what he learned about teaching to a global classroom.

Building Bridges with Parents

A Lake Forest Elementary parent demonstrates how technology is keeping her connected with her child’s learning.

What About Games In Education?
How Games Play into Educaiton

We’re bringing gameplay into more aspects of our lives, spending countless hours — and real money — exploring virtual worlds for imaginary treasures. Why? As Tom Chatfield shows, games are perfectly tuned to dole out rewards that engage the brain and keep us questing for more.

Sasha Barab on New-Media Engagement

A professor of learning sciences at Indiana University explains how new-media literacies are creating new opportunities for student participation.

Lesson Plan

This plan is meant to accompany the Building Bridges with Parents video.