Posted in 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 522 Online Teaching for Adult Learners

Web Conferencing

Reflection Post Web Conferencing

I enjoy taking the opportunity to use new 2.0 tools to reflect on and expand my learning environment and experiences. I find the challenge of synthesizing new information using a new tool brings my learning experience to a whole new level. It makes me think about not only new information, but also question the best tool to help me digest and share what I’ve learned.

For this assignment, there was no question conducting a web conference would be the way to share what I learned. This is something I’m hoping to introduce as a professional development option for teachers this coming year. Though I’ve used Google Hangouts before, I was hoping to get familiar with some other tools. Unfortunately this week is my first week as a distance-learning student with extremely limited Internet connection. In my summer travels, I’ve been reduced to one hour of Internet per week. This experience has been humbling for someone who spends 95% of computer time online. Some of the challenges I’ve run into are waiting for classmates presentations to load, finding photos to use in my presentation, accessing additional research, exploring web-based web conferencing tools, copying and pasting assignment instructions, and limited awareness of peers progress.

As we get ready to introduce Chromebooks in our district next year, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about how I would have completed these assignments if I had taken the ever so light Chromebook on my European vacation. Anyway I think it’s been a good experience to remember what it was like to operate offline and should I have some precautions I’ll be putting in place to make next week go a little smoother.

Web Conferencing

 

Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 512 Online Course Design, DESIGN

Summative & Formative Evaluation Planning

Assignment 1: General Overview of Evaluation Criteria (p. 132)

Evaluation Criteria Explanation Data Source
Appeal: create a connection for user between the formula (daily activities + time management tools = more efficiency.) Review ability to hook the audience by pin pointing real life challenges
  • Teacher KLW survey
  • Application of technologies in the classroom
  • Time on task survey
Usability: ease of user access and use Determine if users are able to navigate the course without any tech support
  • Ability to turn assignments in
  • User interest in taking another similar course
 Effectiveness: ability to utilize the tools as they were taught in the WBI course Determine if participants are able to apply new skills
  • Frequency with which the technologies are applied the classroom

General Evaluation Orientation (p.132)

This course model is oriented toward the participant.  The both formative and summative assessments will be designed to evaluate how well the course has served the participants needs.

Evaluation Matrix: Formative Evaluation Questions. (p140)

Evaluation Criteria & Categories Questions
Appeal
Goals
  • Are the goals relevant to the learner?
  • Is there a clear connection between technology use and time management?
  • Are the goals manageable for learners at varying levels technology proficiencies?
Content
  • Does the information directly address teachers’ daily duties?
  • Is the information applicable immediately?
  • How many people will application of the content impact?
Technology
  • Is the navigation intuitive?
  • Are the materials easy to access?
  • Is the course free of typos?
Message Design
  • Is the course organization easy to understand?
  • Do the videos, graphics, fonts, and colors have universal appeal?
  • Is the course pitched at adult learners of varying age and skill level?
Efficiency
Goals
  • Are the goals stated clearly and concisely?
Content
  • Is the content appropriate for all teaching disciplines?
Technology
  • Is the LMS/web structured properly?
  • Is access to other learners or an instructor an option?
  • Do technology applications outside the course design function easily and efficiently (Google & Weebly)?
Message Design
  • Does the information scaffold on prior skills?
  • Is there a clear organizational pattern?
Effectiveness
Goals
  • How do the goals support best practice instructional strategies?
  • How to the goals reprioritize teachers time?
Content
  • Will the information enable teachers to apply skills immediately or will additional practice be needed?
  • Does the information reflect current instructional practices?
Technology
  • Will the required WBI platform (Edmodo) support learners?
  • Will there be access to an instructor or other learners?
Message Design
  • Is the message design consistent with district instructional practices?
  • Are the directions short and concise?
  • Have screen shots been used according to district standards?

Stakeholders (p.143)

Primary Stakeholders

  • Designer: Responsible for course quality and revisions
  • Instructor: Responsible for informing the designer of snags or challenges in the course
  • Learners: will spend time trying to expunge information from the course
  • Learner’s students: successfully application will directly impact how the students are trained to use these tools.

Secondary Stakeholders

  • ITC department: The course reflects the department’s productivity level
  • School Administration: teachers working smarter reallocates time teachers’ time
  • Parents: Transparency and efficiency = more effective instructional time

What is Being Evaluated? (p.145)

   
  • Motivation strategies
  • Objectives
Design Plans
  • Grouping of objectives
  • Instructions
  • Activities
  • Example Items
Prototype & Website
  • Assessment items
  • Navigation
  • Interface
  • Collaborative Modeling

Who Are The Evaluators and Reviewers (p. 147)

Evaluator/EDTECH 512 Online Course Design Professor:

Youngkyn Baek has his Ph.D., Educational Foundations and Computer Based Instruction. He is a professor at Boise State University and teaches Online Course Design among other online classes.  Areas of Interest and Expertise: Game-based Learning, Instructional Mobile Game Design, Teaching and Learning in Virtual Worlds.

Evaluator/Designer/Instructor: Gillian Riley is an Instructional Technology Coach for SCCPSS. She holds an Education degree and has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She is also a former Instructional Designer and is ¾ through the M.E.T program at Boise State University.

Expert Reviewer (instructional design, subject matter expert): Wendy Marshall is the Program Manager of the Instructional Technology Department of SCCPSS. She is the former director of the Educational Technology Training Center at Armstrong Atlantic State University.

Expert Reviewer (instructional design): Cris Higginbotham has her Ed.S. in Education and is an Instructional Technology Coach SCCPSS high school teachers.  She headed the adoption of Edmodo as a LMS for professional development and has developed the districts first online courses for teachers.

Expert Reviewer (subject matter): Stephen Routh is Science teacher in SCCPSS. He is partnering with the designer to test implementation logistics. Stephen is an avid user of Google Apps for Educators and is a leader of technology integration at his school and throughout the district.

Expert Reviewer (instructional design): Melissa Milligan is and Instructional Technology Coach at the middle and elementary level for SCCPSS. She has her Ed.S. in Education and is an online instructor.

Expert Reviewer (instructor): Caronia Shafer has 12 years teaching experience and is a professional development coach for SCCPSS. She has her Ed.S. in education and works with the designer as an instructional partner.

End-User Reviewer: Teachers who participate in both the face-2-face course and online version will be asked to give feedback on the course after each module. Learners from of the face-2-face version will have required attendance. Those accessing the content online will have chose to take the course. This should be noted as the responses from participants will be impacted based on how they came to take the course.

Evaluation Matrix Revisions (p.152)

Evaluation Criteria & Categories Questions Methods & Tools

 

Appeal

Goals
  • Are the goals relevant to the learner?
  • Is there a clear connection between technology use and time management?
  • Are the goals manageable for learners at varying levels technology proficiencies?
  • Observation
  • Pre-assessment
  • Pre-requisite survey
Content
  • Does the information directly address teachers’ daily duties?
  • Is the information applicable immediately?
  • How many people will application of the content impact?
  • End-user and expert reviews (SME)
  • Observation
  • Survey
Technology
  • Is the navigation intuitive?
  • Are the materials easy to access?
  • Is the course free of typos?
  • End-user and expert reviews (ID)
  • Survey
Message Design
  • Is the course organization easy to understand?
  • Do the videos, graphics, fonts, and colors have universal appeal?
  • Is the course pitched at adult learners of varying age and skill level?
  • End-user and expert reviews (SME, ID)
  • Survey

 

Efficiency

Goals
  • Are the goals stated clearly and concisely?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)
Content
  • Is the content appropriate for all teaching disciplines?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)
  • End-user review
  • Observation
Technology
  • Is the LMS/web structured properly?
  • Is access to other learners or an instructor an option?
  • Do technology applications outside the course design function easily and efficiently (Google & Weebly)?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)
  • End-user review
Message Design
  • Does the information scaffold on prior skills?
  • Is there a clear organizational pattern?
  • Expert review (SME, ID)

Effectiveness

Goals
  • How do the goals support best practice instructional strategies?
  • How to the goals reprioritize teachers time?
Expert review (SME, ID)
Content
  • Will the information enable teachers to apply skills immediately or will additional practice be needed?
  • Does the information reflect current instructional practices?
End-User and expert (SME, ID) review
Technology
  • Will the required WBI platform (Edmodo) support learners?
  • Will there be access to an instructor or other learners?
Expert review (ID, instructor)
Message Design
  • Is the message design consistent with district instructional practices?
  • Are the directions short and concise?
  • Have screen shots been used according to district standards?
  • Expert review  (ID)
  • Instructor review

Assignment 2:  Summative Assessment (p.163)

 Guiding Questions—Evaluating Appeal

  • Is there a change in appeal of face-2-face professional development vs. WBI?
  • What benefits do participants sight as preference for WBI over face-2-face instruction?
  • What challenges do participants sight a detractor for WBI vs. face-2-face instruction?
Data Source  Rationale & communication method Time-frame
Survey participant perceptions Evaluate the appeal of online professional development to present report to department head and board of education. Face-2-face data collected Spring 2013. Online data collected Summer and Winter 2013.
 Guiding Questions—Evaluating Efficiency

  • Do learners find WBI more efficient than face-2-face instruction?
  • Did learners feel their time was spent more efficiently in WBI or face-2-face course?
Data Source Rationale & communication method Time-frame
Survey participant perceptions Evaluate the efficiency of online professional development to present report to department head and board of education. After a face-2-face and online version have been offered (Winter 2013)
 Guiding Questions—Evaluating Effectiveness

  • Was there a difference in implementation rates between face-2-face participants vs. WBI participants?
Data Source Rationale & communication method Time-frame
ObservationInterview participants Evaluate the efficiency of online professional development to present report to department head and board of education. Conducted Spring 2014
Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 512 Online Course Design, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT

EDTECH 512: Online Course Design

Time Management Tools for Teachers Designed by Gillian Riley

timemanagement

Web Based Instructional Design 

 


Final Products

Posted in 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 2.2 Audiovisual Technologies, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 3.1 Media Utilization, 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, UTILIZATION

Math & Science Learning Activities

Good science methodology involves conducting tests and making observations.  In the screencasts below I explore how simulations, virtual manipulative, and a virtual world can be used as learning activities.

Virtual World–Second Life

I’ve long been interested in virtual worlds, who wouldn’t want to explore without paying for gas, hotels, flights, etc., so I took this opportunity to spend a little more time getting my feet wet in Second Life.  I was impressed with resources and activities found on Genome Island; I found scavenger hunts, interactive experiments like the mixallamas gene game, links to outside resources, and really cool virtual simulations like the 3D cell.

I found Second Life exciting and genuinely had the sense of being an explorer, however I did spend as much time experimenting with my avatar’s moves as I did exploring.  Second Life seems like a neat tool for a teacher who is experienced with the Second Life landscape.  Click on the photos to come on a tour with my avatar or click here.

Interactive Science Simulations

Interactive Science Simulations are interactive, research-based simulations of physical phenomena from the PhET™ project at the University of Colorado.  These simulations allow students to play with variables in science and then observe different outcomes as those variables change.  These simulations can be used for all grades either as an inquiry-based exploration or as a guided exploration.  For a quick tour and to hear my thoughts on one of these simulations, click the photo, or click here.

National Library of Virtual Manipulative

The National Library of Virtual Manipulative (NLVM) contains around 100 virtual manipulative that address concepts in numbers & operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data & probability.  These manipulative virtually mimic many classroom manipulative like geoblocks, cuisnes rods, beakers, and rules.  A teacher/parent section describes how each tool supports national math standards.  These tools can be used to practice concepts, explore prior learned with new variables.  I recommend that students use of these tools are guided by critical thinking questions.

The NLVM states, “Learning and understanding mathematics, at every level, requires student engagement. Mathematics is not, as has been said, a spectator sport. Too much of current instruction fails to actively involve students. One way to address the problem is through the use of manipulatives, physical objects that help students visualize relationships and applications.”

Click the photo above to take a quick virtual tour, or click here.

Posted in 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, UTILIZATION

Relative Advantage of Using Technology to Enhance Content Area Learning

Optimal technology integration can play a huge role in increasing student engagement, support, and parent involvement, differentiating learning, class management, simplifying planning and collaborations, and promoting continual professional development.  While many technologies have been designed specifically to streamline learning management, other technologies enhance learning in specific content area.  This is the focus of this post. TPACK planning strategy is a method to design instruction that takes into account technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge.  In sections below, we’ll look at the relative advantage of incorporating various tools to teach specific skills in Language Arts.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Language skills: vocabulary, decoding/phonics, fluency, comprehension.

The advantage to using technology to teach these skills ranges from increased motivation and scaffolding to individualized instruction and feedback.  Specifically, technology provides additional support that typically isn’t available with unless the teacher is working directly with the student or in small groups Roblyer & Doering (2010).  These tools support students to have successful reading experiences by making reading more engaging, encourage the active use of comprehension strategies, and provide learning opportunities within the context of meaningful texts.

Vocabulary Tools

  • interactive vocabulary lessons
  • online dictionaries, thesauri, and encyclopedias, with speech capabilities
  • online texts with hyperlinks that give students definitions of words
  • websites, discussions, online publishing, web logs, and other technology-increase the amount time students spend reading and writing

Decoding/Phonics Tools

  • matching sounds/letters, spoken/written words, or adding letters to complete a word
  • game contexts, visual presentations, and exciting stories to engage and hold interest
  • software that individualizes learning by tracking progress, providing repetition, altering speed of speech, and giving immediate feedback
  • texts with scaffolds to support phonic skills (click words to hear the individual sounds or whole words)
  • individualize stories that focus on the letter-sound correspondences and words that the student has not yet mastered

Fluency Tools

  • model fluent oral reading
  • automated help in decoding individual words
  • highlighted phrases to guide expressive reading
  • pronunciation and meaning support, allowing beginners to attempt more challenging text on their own
  • speech recognition tools that offer immediate help while reading aloud
  • recording and analysis tools to help assess students’ levels of fluency and inform instructional decisions.

Comprehension Tools

  • hypertext/hypermedia to scaffold comprehension including clarifications, summaries, concept maps, and thinking questions
  • embedded prompts that ask students to answer questions, add to concept maps or other graphic organizers, or summarize information
  • active reading prompting students to read words aloud, provide definitions, explain concepts in texts, and provide visual aids.

Literacy Development:

Technology can be used to increase literacy development by matching students with text that fits their reading interests and level, connecting students with real-life reading opportunities, building broader connections around stories, and offering unique chances for students to reflect and share their thoughts (Sherman et al 2004).  The primary advantage to implementing technology for literacy development is that it creates authentic opportunities for students to use their literacy skills.  Students need to understand technology use in professional or formal settings.

Literacy Development Tools

  • Online reading materials: ebooks, news, discussion boards, how-to, pop-culture, fiction/non-fiction stories
  • interactive story books: talking/electronic books, highlighter/notetaking functions, hypermedia links
  • digital story telling including computer-based images, text, recorded audio narration, video clips and/or music.
  • blog chronicling or journal writing
  • video projects that include concepting, script-writing, editing, rewriting, story-boarding, and filming
  • Collaborative literacy projects with writers or other professionals, other schools/grade levels, and people in other cultures
  • Discussion boards, instant messaging, microbloging, emailing, vlogs, wall-posts, crowd sourcing

Writing Process:

If you’ve written anything of any length by hand lately, you probably remember how difficult it is to do any major editing without starting over from scratch.  Today’s digital writing process allows students to easily play with words, revise sentence structures, reorder events, collaborate, and experiment with different publishing options.  Word processing tools developed out of writers’ needs rather than a fun computer tool (Kunde 1986).  By 1977 with the advent of the floppy disk, word processing was separated to from computer hardward and is now “one of the most common general applications for personal computers.” (Blissmer 1985)

Writing Process Tools

  • story generators including setting, characters, plot, solution
  • brainstorming graphic organizers, concept mapping, electronic outliners
  • word processing to edit, spell check, reorder text, and check grammar
  • desktop publishing including newspapers, brochures, books, booklets
  • web publishing including blogs and web sites

References

Blissmer, Robert H. (1985). An introduction to information systems 1985-1986. Computer Annual.  New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Kunde, B. (2008). A brief history of word processing (through 1986). Redwood City: Fleabonnet Press. Retrieved from http://www.stanford.edu/~bkunde/fb-press/articles/wdprhist.html#BL

Roblyer, M.D, & Doering, A. H. (2013). Integrating educational technology into teaching (6th ed.). Boston: Pearson.

Sherman, D. & Kleiman, G. & Peterson, K. (2004). Technology and teaching children to read:  what does the research have to say? Education Development Center, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.neirtec.org/reading_report/report.htm

Posted in 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, 3.4 Policies and Regulations, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, UTILIZATION

Educators in the New Digital Age–Getting Started

I’m looking forward to my new job as an instructional technology coach for my school district.  My classroom experience has me thinking about how we, as coaches, will measure our progress and how we will set benchmarks.  I’m working on creating a survey for teachers based on the ISTE National Education Technology Standards for Teachers.  These standards cover how technology is used to enhance collaboration, digital-age learning experiences, digital citizenship, and digital work/learning environments.  While I work on the survey, below is a list of some resources that are helping me synthesize how great tools can translate to great teaching.

Resources

Posted in 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.1 Media Utilization, 4.2 Resource Management, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, MANAGEMENT, UTILIZATION

Steps to Social Networking Stardom

Technology is evolving at the speed of light and no matter what your experience levels is it can feel impossible to keep up with all the latest gadgets and tool.  But sometimes, especially when it comes to technology, being the jack-of-all-trades won’t give you or your students the best pay off.  So this semester, lets get off the cyber super highway and zero in on one tool that will make some serious gains in the classroom.  Choose either Learing Adventure one or two and then complete the Final Mission.

Create a Professional Learning Network: Twitter PLN

Regular positive encounters with other educators can make the difference between feeling like an isolated island or that you have an army of support behind you.  So how do you develop you Professional Learning Network, or PLN?  Believe it or not, Twitter has become amazing tools for connecting people quickly.  Today, if you’re not already a member, you get to see what all the hype is about.

Learner’s Adventure #1

  1. Browse the Twitter Resources below
  2. Sign up for a Twitter account & record your login info.
  3. Find me and follow me @ FrankEducator.
  4. Post your first tweet.

 

Twitter Resources

What’s a PLN?  Sketchy Explaination: Starting a PLN

Edutopia “How to use Twitter to Grow Ur PLN.”

Edudemic “100 Ways to your Twitter in Education”

 

Claim Your Space in The Cloud: Diigo Social Bookmark

Diigo is a bookmarking tool that allows you to flag items of interest and then later access them from any computer or phone when you log on to your Diigo account.  You can see what other people are bookmarking and have access to all webpages of interest from anywhere.  If you don’t have a Diigo account, today is the day you will join the cloud.

Learner’s Adventure #2

  1. Browse the Diigo Resources below
  2. Sign up for a Diigo account and record your login info.
  3. Start bookmarking your favorite education sites.
  4. Share your bookmark with your teaching team and invite them join.

Diigo Resources

Using Diigo: Adding Bookmarks to Your Library

12 Reasons to use Diigo in the Classroom

Using Diigo in the Classroom

 

Final Mission-Wall Wisher

Either or the tools you explored today have a lot of components and many options you can use for bringing them into the classroom.  To wrap up the day, we’ll share our ah-ha’s, road blocks, and outstanding questions on Wallwisher.  This site works just like Post-It’s.

  1. Follow this link to our Wallwishers wrapup.
  2. Create and account and record your login info
  3. Post an ah-ha, a roadblock you faced, and a question you still have (they can all be on the same post)
  4. Review the resources below to see if Wallwisher has a place in your classroom.

 

Wallwisher Resources

Using Wallwisher

What Can You do with Wallwisher?

Interesting Ways to Use Wallwisher in the Classroom

 

Thanks for participating!

Posted in 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, 3.4 Policies and Regulations, All, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, UTILIZATION

Social Media in the Classroom–What’s your opinion?

Log on to this VoiceThread discussion to give your thoughts about Social Media in the classroom.  Feel free to comment on the discussion points that resonate with you.  You’ll need a VoiceThread account to comment, so sign up here if you haven’t already.

Join the conversation here.

Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT

EDTECH’s 50 Must Read K-12 IT Blogs

I don’t think anyone would disagree there’s an overabundance of information to keep up with on the web, especially if your interest is the ever evolving field of EDTECH.  My favorite web tools are those that help us curate and manage content.  If you’re looking for a great place to get started, browse these high quality blogs.  My recommendation would be to pick no more than three and look for authors that cover different topics and those who publish on different dates.

EDTECH’s 50 Must Read K-12 IT Blogs 2012

 

Posted in 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 3.1 Media Utilization, DESIGN, UTILIZATION

Video Integration Resources

Here are some great resources to find videos to use in the classroom.

Posted in 1. Instructional Systems Design, 1.2 Message Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 1.4 Learner Characteristics, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.1 Media Utilization, 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, 4.3 Delivery System Management, 4.4 Information Management, 5.4 Long-Range Planning, All, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, EVALUATION, MANAGEMENT, UTILIZATION

Multimedia Integration In the Classroom

The following are a collection of videos to help teachers see what technology integration looks like in the classroom and how it is transforming the learning process. Please be aware the Ted Talk videos do not have a stop play button so you will need to exit out of the site when they finished.

What Technology Integration Looks Like In Elementary School

Meet the faculty at Forest Lake Elementary in Columbia, SC. Starting as techno- novices, they now use customizable software, interactive whiteboards, digital cameras, and more to tailor lessons to the individual needs of diverse students. To see more exciting reports from our Schools that Work series, please visit our website: http://www.edutopia.org/stw-differentiated-instruction-south-carolina

What Technology Integration Looks Like in High School

The DNA of Learning: Teens Tackle Animal Poaching Through Genetics

Eleventh-grade biotechnology students use DNA barcoding to help save endangered African wildlife.

 

Twelfth grade students use Google docs to collaborate on a group science paper. They use scholarly research searches, power point, video and sound clips, blogs, and ScyncronEyes to broadcast to other students computer screens.

Technology Integration with Google Drive

Team Teaching: Two Teachers, Three Subjects, One Project

A pair of educators are sanguine about their art, biology, and multimedia program.

Teaching Kids Real Math With Computers

Conrad Wolfram who runs the mathematical lab and research division behind cutting-edge knowledge engine Wolfram Alpha make an argument teaching real world math in school and leaving computation to computers.

What Technology Integration Looks Like In the Abroad

The Child-Driven Education

Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education — the best teachers and schools don’t exist where they’re needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

Technology Innovation in Slums

Charles Leadbeater, a researcher with the think tank Demos in London, looks at effective education innovation in slums around the world.

What Could A One-to-One Education Look Like?

Electronic TextBooks
Envision electronic textbooks the way Apple sees them.

Technology Integration from CaseNEX on Vimeo.

The 100-Student Classroom

In the fall of 2011 Peter Norvig taught a class with Sebastian Thrun on artificial intelligence at Stanford attended by 175 students in situ — and over 100,000 via an interactive webcast. He shares what he learned about teaching to a global classroom.

Building Bridges with Parents

A Lake Forest Elementary parent demonstrates how technology is keeping her connected with her child’s learning.

What About Games In Education?
How Games Play into Educaiton

We’re bringing gameplay into more aspects of our lives, spending countless hours — and real money — exploring virtual worlds for imaginary treasures. Why? As Tom Chatfield shows, games are perfectly tuned to dole out rewards that engage the brain and keep us questing for more.

Sasha Barab on New-Media Engagement

A professor of learning sciences at Indiana University explains how new-media literacies are creating new opportunities for student participation.

Lesson Plan

This plan is meant to accompany the Building Bridges with Parents video.